HAN CHIAO

SANS TITRE

MAY 2, 2024 - JUL 27, 2024

OPENING RECEPTION
MAY 2, 2024 | 6-8PM

THREE TWO ONE CANAL STREET
NEW YORK, NY 10013

INFO@RWGUILDGALLERYNY.COM
646.693.0279

Installation

Works

Arch Shell

2023

BLACK STONEWARE

20"H X 17.75"W X 11.75"D

HANC25

Backbones

2023

BLACK STONEWARE WITH RUSTY GLAZE

17.25"H X 16"W X 8.75"D

HANC08

Bell

2023

BLACK STONEWARE WITH RUSTY GLAZE

9.5"H X 13.75"DIA

HANC21

Caress of Teeth Low Vessel

2022

BLACK STONEWARE

6"H x 17.5"W x 6.5"D

HANC03

Caress of Teeth Vessel

2021

BLACK STONEWARE WITH RUSTY GLAZE

15"H X 16.5"W X 11.75"D

HANC22

Deer

2022

BLACK STONEWARE

19.25"H X 9.75"W X 5.25"D

HANC06

Double Necks

2023

BLACK STONEWARE WITH VELVET MATTE INK GLAZE

20"H X 14.25"W X 14.25"D

HANC05

Dragon Fruit Series, Handful Vessel

2023

BLACK STONEWARE WITH RUSTY GLAZE

9.75"H X 5"DIA

HANC13

Dragon Fruit Series, Skinny Vessel

2023

BLACK STONEWARE WITH ASSAD BLACK GLAZE

19.75"H X 6.75"DIA

HANC14

About the Show

Guild Gallery is pleased to present "Sans Titre," the first U.S. solo exhibition of Han Chiao (b. 1978, Taiwan), a Paris-based artist known for her work in sculpture. Originally trained as a fashion photographer, Han Chiao’s eye for composition and form translated with clarity in clay. While studying in Paris, France and Jingdezhen, China, she found her voice in angular and curvaceous vessels that are rife with contradictions. Sophisticated lines are often delivered with naïve textures, classical forms are reimagined in surreal proportions, and sensuality always has an edge.

 

HAN CHIAO'S “MONSTER IN WHITE COLLAR,” 2024, BLACK STONEWARE WITH RUSTY GLAZE

 

For this exhibition, Han Chiao is debuting more than 20 new works, including some of her largest pieces to date. Shifting from past explorations of colorful glazing and painterly tableware, Han Chiao has been focused on working with rough, black clay glazed in thin, transparent white washes. This unvarnished approach communicates her sensitivity for shape and complexity without a scrim of artifice. “I chose this rough clay on purpose. It’s untamed, something savage,” says Han Chiao.

 

HAN CHIAO FORMS HER VESSELS FROM ROUGH CLAY, LEFT COARSE TO HONOR THE TEXTURE OF THE EARTH SHE WORKS WITH.

“It’s very elemental: going back to an unpolished, unformed beginning of something, before we put layers on.”

– HAN CHIAO

From her Paris studio, Han Chiao begins her work with a drawing of a shape, or with a physical impulse as simple as pushing out or pulling up. She sets her hands into the black clay, throwing a symmetrical form on the wheel. Once the clay starts to dry, she begins her slow, intuitive trademark work of deconstruction, pressing her body into the vessels, distorting their proportions to create otherworldly dimensions, and giving her work “teeth” in the form of sharp protrusions until each piece is relieved from the expectations of perfection. The process of a single work can take months. “It’s very elemental: going back to an unpolished, unformed beginning of something, before we put layers on,” says Han Chiao. “With age, once you understand life a bit better, you realize that a lot of things are just façade.”

HAN CHIAO AT HER STUDIO IN PARIS.

Honoring the texture of the earth she works with, the clay is left coarse, marked by the imprint of her body and, occasionally, her own fingerprints. Glazing, when employed, is done sparingly, in thin, dripping washes. “Life is not perfect, it’s not so symmetrical. Each piece is supposed to have its own life. I want them to be quite emotionally alive.”

 

LEFT: FOR THIS EXHIBITION, HAN CHIAO IS EXPERIMENTING WITH SOME OF HER LARGEST PIECES TO DATE, SHAPING THEM INTO OTHERWORLDLY DIMENSIONS. RIGHT: A COLLECTION OF WORKS IN PROGRESS AT HAN CHIAO'S PARIS STUDIO.

 

Han Chiao is attracted to the resulting interplay of tension. She describes the impulse to top a romantic arc with the surprise of a spiked mouth as a gesture of honesty, something that allows her to reveal more of herself—making her artistic practice something of a homecoming.

 

HAN CHIAO MOLDS HER CLAY BY HAND ON THE WHEEL, THROWING A SYMMETRICAL FORM BEFORE GRADUALLY, GENTLY DISTORTING AND DECONSTRUCTING IT.

“I love combinations of contradictions in shape, curves, proportion, and texture. I like to challenge my pieces because something beautiful should never be easy.”

– HAN CHIAO